Home | News | Local shelters ensure everyone gets a warm bed during cold snap
Thieves not idle: police warn drivers about increase in car thefts
Quiet change to free downtown parking called deceitful

Local shelters ensure everyone gets a warm bed during cold snap





Local shelters are hitting the roads making sure no one is left in the cold.

As a result of an extreme weather warning issued by Environment Canada, the Salvation Army, the Bear Clan Patrol and the Main Street Project will have vehicles patrolling the city at different times, handing out warm clothing and food, and shuttling homeless people to shelters.

Extreme cold will continue over most of southern Manitoba throughout Christmas, Boxing Day and beyond, according to Environment Canada. Below-average temperatures create an elevated risk to health, and people are more susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia as a result of the cold, especially those outside at night.

Overnight lows are dipping to -30 C with daytime highs in the -20 C range. In addition, extreme wind chills can make it feel like -45, said Environment Canada.

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 60 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Add a payment method

To read the remaining 210 words of this article.

Pay only 27¢ for articles you wish to read.

Hope you enjoyed your trial.

Add a payment method

To read the remaining 210 words of this article.

Pay only 27¢ for articles you wish to read.

Local shelters are hitting the roads making sure no one is left in the cold.

As a result of an extreme weather warning issued by Environment Canada, the Salvation Army, the Bear Clan Patrol and the Main Street Project will have vehicles patrolling the city at different times, handing out warm clothing and food, and shuttling homeless people to shelters.

Extreme cold will continue over most of southern Manitoba throughout Christmas, Boxing Day and beyond, according to Environment Canada. Below-average temperatures create an elevated risk to health, and people are more susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia as a result of the cold, especially those outside at night.

Overnight lows are dipping to -30 C with daytime highs in the -20 C range. In addition, extreme wind chills can make it feel like -45, said Environment Canada.

The Bear Clan Patrol is out every evening handing out care packages containing food, hygiene products, warm clothing and blankets, and directing people to shelters. The Salvation Army shuttle joins them most evenings from 11 p.m. to 4 a.m.

The Main Street Project will have their outreach van on the road every day from 3 p.m. to 8 a.m. beginning Jan. 15.

"Overnight we find is the most tumultuous time, but the three shelters have a wonderful co-ordinated access plan so that nobody is left on in the cold," said Adrienne Dudek, director of the Main Street Project.

Typically, when someone is picked up by a shuttle they are taken to the Salvation Army, said leader of the Bear Clan Patrol, James Favel.

However, when the Free Press contacted the shelter on Monday, they said they were already beyond their maximum capacity. Both the shelter and Favel made assurances that they do not turn anyone away because of the cold, even if it does result in cramped quarters.

If the shelter is full, they'll try the Siloam Mission or the Main Street Project, said Favel, noting, however, that those shelters are most likely at capacity at this time of year too.

kiera.kowalski@freepress.mb.ca


CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM: News Visit website

  Article "tagged" as:
No tags for this article
view more articles

About Article Author

Latest USA News