Home | News | Feds to help Churchill residents pay high cost of gas
Journalism still necessary in Canada: survey
Manitoba announces operators of legal cannabis stores

Feds to help Churchill residents pay high cost of gas





OTTAWA — The federal government has again dipped into its economic-stimulus fund for Churchill in order to help residents with skyrocketing gas prices.

Meanwhile, the federal transport regulator will soon issue its findings in the ongoing probe of Omnitrax, which owns the northern town’s port and railway.

On Friday, natural Resources Minister Jim Carr announced Ottawa would release $132,870 to allow Exchange Petroleum to reduce gasoline prices to the amount they were before the town’s railway lifeline washed out last May.

Since Nov. 1, 2017, gas has retailed between $2.20 and $2.35 per litre, and this week’s funding intends to drop it to $1.70, though the cost can fluctuate based on retail value.

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 60 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Add a payment method

To read the remaining 239 words of this article.

Pay only 27¢ for articles you wish to read.

Hope you enjoyed your trial.

Add a payment method

To read the remaining 239 words of this article.

Pay only 27¢ for articles you wish to read.

OTTAWA — The federal government has again dipped into its economic-stimulus fund for Churchill in order to help residents with skyrocketing gas prices.

Meanwhile, the federal transport regulator will soon issue its findings in the ongoing probe of Omnitrax, which owns the northern town’s port and railway.

On Friday, natural Resources Minister Jim Carr announced Ottawa would release $132,870 to allow Exchange Petroleum to reduce gasoline prices to the amount they were before the town’s railway lifeline washed out last May.

Since Nov. 1, 2017, gas has retailed between $2.20 and $2.35 per litre, and this week’s funding intends to drop it to $1.70, though the cost can fluctuate based on retail value.

The money comes from the Churchill and Region Economic Development Fund, which Ottawa launched in September 2016 with the original intention of diversifying northern Manitoba’s economy after Omnitrax announced port layoffs that summer.

The fund has been used to subsidize businesses paying the high cost of shipping materials by plane and boat.

But it’s also helped carve out new economic opportunities, such as a hydroponic vegetable-growing lab, and the ice trail between Churchill and Gillam, whose leader aims to later develop winter links with Nunavut.

In December, Carr visited the town to top up the $4.6-million fund by $2.7 million.

The funding announced Friday will go to Exchange Petroleum, which owns the Calm Air fuel-storage tanks at the Churchill airport.

The firm stepped in when an issue emerged with the ability of the port’s storage tanks to hold gas throughout the winter.

"This project is a great example of how collaboration and partnerships can help lessen Churchill’s acute economic hardships, restore quality of life, and keep its entrepreneurs in business," CEO Gary Bell wrote in a statement.

Churchill Mayor Mike Spence thanked Ottawa for its leadership and said he was optimistic repairs on the railway would start this spring.

"This announcement means real savings for residents and businesses of Churchill during these difficult economic times," Spence wrote. "It’s important to also give a great deal of credit to Exchange Petroleum who stepped in last fall."

dylan.robertson@freepress.mb.ca


CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM: News Visit website

  Article "tagged" as:
No tags for this article
view more articles

About Article Author

Latest USA News